politics

UN finds nations climate plans fall short of Paris accord

UN finds nations climate plans fall short of Paris accord

The world’s emissions reductions plans would allow far more global warming than targeted in the Paris climate accord, and some of the biggest emitters, including the U.S., aren’t on track to hit their pollution targets, according to a report from the United Nations. Tuesday’s report adds urgency to the climate summit set to begin in a few days in Scotland, the first major one since more than 190 nations signed the Paris agreement in 2015. Countries are searching for ways to reach the agreement’s goals, which call for them to ensure the rise in global temperatures by the end of the century is well under 2 degrees Celsius compared with the preindustrial era, and strive to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. The U.N. report analyzes all plans submitted under the Paris accord as of Sept. 30, and those—such as China’s—that haven’t been submitted. It finds the measures detailed in those plans through 2030 would still leave the world 2.7 degrees warmer by the end of the century. This confirmed a finding from September that didn’t include analysis of China’s plan or big polluters such as South Africa. The report found that pledged to hit net-zero emissions—with greenhouse gases offset by natural or other means of absorbing emissions—could bring down end-of-century warming to 2.2 degrees. However, the targets set by countries are for the midcentury or later; China has pledged to be carbon neutral by 2060, while the U.S. and the European Union has said they it will get to net zero by 2050. The pledges often have little substance behind them, according to the report. Nations “need to make their net zero pledges more concrete, said Inger Andersen, executive director of the United Nations Environment Program, which wrote the report. “We are not doing ourselves a favor by kicking the net zero plan down the road until 2050. We need to take action before 2030. The report said that the US is one of several Group of 20 economies that hasn’t put policies in place to achieve the emissions targets of its previous plan submitted under the Paris accord, let alone its updated plan submitted from this year. The Biden administration has struggled to pass its emissions reductions plans through Congress because of opposition from Republicans and some centrist Democrats. Download.

politics 2021-10-26 Livemint